L3DB6H

Lloyd Bosworth : archaeologist | human | beard

Posts in the 3d category

3D Printing and Archaeobotany

Can archaeobotany benefit from 3D printing technology?

pollen-microscopeTwo things I’ve read recently have led me to ask myself this question. The first was reading that a researcher at Massey University, New Zealand, had created 3D printed models of pollen scaled 2000-3000 times actual size. Dr Katherine Holt noticed that her students struggled to identify pollen types through the two-dimensional imaging of traditional optical microscopes. Having seen 3D models being viewed on a computer screen, she thought that the next obvious step would be to 3D print scaled-up models of pollen and, using a confocal microscope, created 3-dimensional models of pollen from four tree species. (more…)

We can replicate it for you wholesale

This is incredible. The video below, from the Fraunhofer Institute for Computer Graphics Research (Fraunhofer IGD), showcases what the latest 3D digitisation technology can achieve. Their CultLab3D modular scanning system can take a cultural artefact and produce a high resolution 3D model in just ten minutes. Amazingly, this system carries out all the post processing, image colour correction and texture creation automatically; all the curator has to do is place the object on the conveyor belt at the start, and remove it at the end.

Through automation, 3D digitisation can now be carried out at scales previously unheard of, bringing with it a reduction in cost. By bringing down the cost of 3D digitisation, Fraunhofer IGD claim to have made it financially viable for institutions to digitise whole collections.
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Google Earth Pro now Free!

Google Earth Pro reduced by $400!

Georeferenced LiDAR image of Bigbury Hill Fort, Canterbury, imported directly into Google Earth Pro. On January 30, 2015, Google announced that the Pro version of their Google Earth software would come down in price… to free. Until now, the Pro version would have set you back $400 per year. For those on a tight budget, (or with sense!), this was reason enough to stick with the free version and forgo the extra tools in Google Earth Pro.

I always felt that $400 per year was an almighty rip-off and was happy to integrate the free version within my workflow as far as it could go, and then use other tools where necessary. But what could you do with the $400 Google Earth Pro that you couldn’t do with Google Earth, and why should you now switch? Well, it’s not for higher-resolution imagery, as this is the same across all Google products. But the available toolkit for working with this imagery does increase.
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Why a 3D Topographic Model?

dem created in arcgis from contour dataI’ve been asked to produce a walk-through animation of a reconstructed archaeological site that shows the landscape setting of important buildings, and how these buildings constrained the movement of people. Reconstructing the buildings is pretty simple, with lots of reference material available. However, the 3D topographical model of the landscape is much trickier, made worse by not having any digital elevation data, only paper maps with contours.

Drawing contours with height attributes is easy in ArcGIS, but when I was asked to create an animation, I had no idea how to get the GIS shapefile data into my 3d software for animating. I figured there must be a way, and sure enough, ArcGIS has all the tools for converting and exporting a shapefile that can then be opened in pretty much any 3d software package.
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Scratched into the surface of this Roman tile is graffiti insulting someone called Attius, calling him stupid, or possibly something altogether more vulgar. It was 3D laser scanned as part of a week-long event where Canterbury Roman Museum poet in residence, Dan Simpson, walks the Roman road from London to Canterbury. Along the way, Dan will be visiting museums and talking to experts about Roman life, tweeting thoughts and photos, and composing poetry.

“Atti Ped” – Roman tile with graffiti.
by l3db6h
on Sketchfab

The walk is supported by the University of Kent’s School of European Culture & Languages.

The Roman tile is on display at Dartford Borough Museum.

More about Dan here.